In This Section

Standing Up For Wronged Employees

James "Bo" Bolus recognizes that the majority of a person's life is spent at work and practically nothing can be more devastating — emotionally, physically and financially — than to be mistreated at one's place of employment.

The Bolus Law Offices has developed a practice niche with its successful handling of employee discrimination, harassment and wrongful termination claims. We file cases on behalf of aggrieved employees under virtually every existing state and federal civil rights statute, including:

  • Federal Civil Rights Act (Title VII)
  • Kentucky Civil Rights Act (KRS 344)
  • Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA)
  • Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
  • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
  • State and federal whistleblower statutes

Championing The Rights Of Employees Facing Harassment And Discrimination

An employee is considered to be part of a protected class when they are of a different race, sex, creed, religion, age, disability, national orientation or sexual orientation (in some jurisdictions) than the majority of the populace. It is unlawful to treat someone differently or to harass them because they are in a protected class. It is also unlawful to retaliate against an employee who reports or complains to an employer about perceived mistreatment because of his/her different race, sex, creed, religion, age, disability, national orientation or sexual orientation (in some jurisdictions).

If you have been mistreated at work and believe it is because of your race, sex, creed, religion, age, disability national origin and/or sexual orientation, or believe you have been retaliated against because you complained about what you believe to be mistreatment at your workplace, contact an employment lawyer at our office today.

To discuss your case call an attorney at our Louisville office today at 502-410-3858 or contact us online.

A Proven Track Record Of Success

In 1996, James "Bo" Bolus co-counseled a case to a jury trial that resulted in a $2 million jury verdict for a female manger at the local Philip Morris cigarette manufacturing plant. The jury found the client was constructively discharged, i.e., forced to resign due to intolerable working conditions related to sexual harassment and/or retaliation. The constructive discharge claim was pled (i.e., made a part of the lawsuit) because, and only after, James "Bo" Bolus was asked to work on the litigation. After an unsuccessful appeal, the total payment by the defendant was over $4 million, including interest, expenses and attorneys' fees.

The outcome of this case led The Washington Post to quote James "Bo" Bolus in an article it ran in a series addressing sexual harassment in the workplace, which was a relatively hot topic at the time due to happenings in the White House and elsewhere in the political landscape. Please refer to the Verdicts and Settlements and Published Decision sections for a sampling of James "Bo" Bolus' experience and successes in this ever-changing area of the law.